Seasonal Allergies—All Year Long

While most people naturally associate springtime with seasonal allergies when many trees, plants and grasses release pollens into the environment, each of the four seasons can actually trigger allergy symptoms in sufferers.

Because allergies are the body’s overactive immune response to what it perceives as foreign “invaders”, allergens come in many forms at all different times of the year.

Some of these may include:

Trees
Grasses
Pollens
Mold
Smoke
Insect bites and stings
Chlorine
Candy and celebratory food ingredients
Pine trees and wreaths

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Allergies for All Seasons

Fall—

From August to November Ragweed releases pollen into the air causing itchy swollen eyes, runny nose, scratchy throat and sinus congestion for many who are allergic. Prevalent mainly in the Midwest and on the East coast, Ragweed does grow everywhere in the United States and becomes airborne the most throughout mid-September.

Other fall weeds that promote allergies include:

Burning bush
Cocklebur
Lamb’s-quarters
Pigweed
Sagebrush and Mugwort
Tumbleweed and Russian thistle

Winter—

From December through March, indoor allergies affect millions of people, triggering a multitude of symptoms. (Milder winter temperatures can also bring about early pollination of some plants and grasses).

Indoor allergens include:

Dust mites
Mold
Pet dander
Fireplace smoke
Pine trees (holiday trees)
Wreaths
Holiday candy ingredients

Spring—

One of the biggest allergens in springtime is pollen. April through June, these tiny grains are released into the atmosphere by trees, grasses, and weeds in order to fertilize other plants. When persons who are allergic ingest these tiny particles, the body’s immune system goes into overdrive.

The following trees, grasses and weeds are common offenders:

Trees

Alder
Ash
Aspen
Beech
Box elder
Cedar
Cottonwood
Cypress
Elm
Hickory
Juniper
Maple
Mulberry
Oak
Olive
Palm
Pine
Poplar
Sycamore
Willow

Grasses and weeds

Bermuda
Fescue
Johnson
June
Orchard
Perennial rye
Redtop
Saltgrass
Sweet vernal
Timothy

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Summer—

Warmer days, higher humidity and, outdoor activities leave allergy sufferers vulnerable to a host of common triggers present in summertime environments June, July, and August. Many of these are natural plants, grasses, and pests while others are common manmade substances.

Insect bites and stings
Mold
Chlorine
Smoke (campfires)
Seasonal fruit
Sunscreen
Poison ivy

Weeds:

Ragweed
Cockleweed
Pigweed
Russian thistle
Sagebrush
Tumbleweed

Grasses:

Bermuda
Blue grasses
Orchard
Red Top
Sweet vernal
Timothy grass
Johnson grass
Rye grass

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Although many allergens are present in each of the four seasons, certain plants and trees, as well as pollen counts vary by region throughout the country.

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